Mot-clé : Signal

2010

Work Stealing Scheduler for Automatic Parallelization in Faust

Linux Audio Conference, 2010, Utrecht, Netherlands

Faust 0.9.10 introduces an alternative to OpenMP based parallel code generation using a Work Steal- ing Scheduler and explicit management of worker threads. This paper explains the new option and presents some benchmarks.

Stéphane Letz, Yann Orlarey, Dominique Fober

Mots-clés :
Compiler, Dataflow, Functional, Processing, Programming, Real-time, Signal

Automatic Paralllelization of Audio Applications with Faust

Congrès Français d'Acoustique, 2010, Lyon, France

Faust (Functional AUdio STreams) [1] stands for both a programming language and its compiler. Being fully compiled allows Faust to be used as an alternative to C/C++ to develop high-performance audio signal processing applications, DSP libraries and plug-ins for a variety of audio platforms and standards.

Yann Orlarey, Stéphane Letz, Dominique Fober

Mots-clés :
Compiler, Dataflow, Functional, Processing, Programming, Real-time, Signal

Partitions musicales augmentées

Journées d'Informatique Musicale, 2010, Rennes, France. pp.97-103

Une partition musicale augmentée est une partition mettant en relation un objet musical symbolique avec différentes représentations de son interprétation. La partition musicale est à considérer au sens large, comme un objet graphique permettant de représenter un objet temporel. L'interprétation représente une instance sonore ou gestuelle particulière de la partition. Nous présenterons les fondements théoriques qui sous-tendent la partition augmentée, ainsi qu'u... read_more

Une partition musicale augmentée est une partition mettant en relation un objet musical symbolique avec différentes représentations de son interprétation. La partition musicale est à considérer au sens large, comme un objet graphique permettant de représenter un objet temporel. L'interprétation représente une instance sonore ou gestuelle particulière de la partition. Nous présenterons les fondements théoriques qui sous-tendent la partition augmentée, ainsi qu'une application sous forme d'afficheur mettant en oeuvre les solutions proposées.

Dominique Fober, Christophe Daudin, Stéphane Letz, Yann Orlarey

Mots-clés :
Graphique, Interprétation, Musicale, Partition, Signal, Synchronization

2009

FAUST : an Efficient Functional Approach to DSP Programming

Editions DELATOUR FRANCE. NEW COMPUTATIONAL PARADIGMS FOR COMPUTER MUSIC, pp.65-96, 2009

FAUST is a programming language that provides a purely functional approach to signal processing while offering a high level of performance. FAUST aims at being complementary to existing audio languages by offering a viable and efficient alternative to C/C++ to develop signal processing libraries, audio plug-ins or standalone applications. The language is based on a simple and well defined formal semantics. A FAUST program denotes a signal processor, a mathemati... read_more

FAUST is a programming language that provides a purely functional approach to signal processing while offering a high level of performance. FAUST aims at being complementary to existing audio languages by offering a viable and efficient alternative to C/C++ to develop signal processing libraries, audio plug-ins or standalone applications. The language is based on a simple and well defined formal semantics. A FAUST program denotes a signal processor, a mathematical function that transforms input signals into output signals. Being able to know precisely what a program computes is important not only for programmers, but also for compilers needing to generate the best possible code. Moreover these semantics questions are crucial for the long term preservation of music programs. The following paragraphs will give an overview of the language as well as a description of the compiler, including the generation of parallel code.

Yann Orlarey, Dominique Fober, Stéphane Letz

Mots-clés :
Compiler, Dataflow, Functional, Processing, Programming, Real-time, Signal

Semantics for multirate Faust

[Technical Report] GRAME. 2009

Faust is a functional programming language dedicated to the specification of executable monorate musical applications. We present here a multirate extension of the core of the Faust language, called MR Faust, together with a typing semantics, a denotational semantics and correctness theorems that link them together.

Pierre Jouvelot, Yann Orlarey

Mots-clés :
FAUST, Multirate, Processing, Signal

Adding Automatic Parallelization to Faust

Linux Audio Conference, 2009, Parma, Italy

Faust 0.9.9.5 introduces new compilation options to do automatic parallelization of code using OpenMP. This paper explains how the automatic parallelization is done and presents some benchmarks.

Yann Orlarey, Stéphane Letz, Dominique Fober

Mots-clés :
FAUST, OpenMP, Parallelism, Processing, Signal

2006

This document is a quick-reference to the Faust language (version 0.9.8), a programming language for real-time signal processing and synthesis that targets high-performance signal processing applications and audio plugins.

DSP Programming with Faust, Q and SuperCollider

Linux Audio Conference, 2006, Karlsruhe, Germany

Faust is a functional programming language for realtime signal processing and synthesis that targets high-performance signal processing applications and audio plugins. The paper gives a brief introduction to Faust and discusses its interfaces to Q, a general purpose functional programming language, and SuperCollider, an object-oriented sound synthesis language and engine.

Yann Orlarey, Albert Graef, Stefan Kersten

Mots-clés :
Computer, Digital, FAUST, Functional, Language, Music, Processing, Programming, Q, Signal, SuperCollider

2004

This paper presents some syntactical and semantical aspects of FAUST (Functional AUdio STreams), a programming language for real-time sound processing and synthesis. The programming model of FAUST combines two approaches : functional programming and block-diagrams composition. It is based on a block-diagram algebra. It has a well defined formal semantic and can be compiled into efficient C/C++ code.

Yann Orlarey, Dominique Fober, Stéphane Letz

Mots-clés :
Processing, Compiler, Dataflow, Functional programming, Real-time, Signal

2003

This document presents the language FAUST, its syntax and grammar as well as several commented examples. FAUST (the name stands for Functional Audio Streams) is a programming language specifically designed to develop and implement efficient real time digital signal processors.

Etienne Gaudrain, Yann Orlarey

Mots-clés :
Audio, Block-diagrams, Functionnal, Processing, Programming, Real, Signal, Time

Automatic vectorization in Faust

Journées d'Informatique Musicale, 2003, Montbeliard, France

Faust is a Block-Diagram language for sound signal processing and synthesis. It implements a new algebraic representation of block-diagrams and adopts a functional model of semantics instead of a data flow model. Based on these elements, a compiler able to translate DSP block diagram specification into C code is briefly presented. The code produced proves to be efficient and can compete with a hand written code. The optimization process is even pushed further:... read_more

Faust is a Block-Diagram language for sound signal processing and synthesis. It implements a new algebraic representation of block-diagrams and adopts a functional model of semantics instead of a data flow model. Based on these elements, a compiler able to translate DSP block diagram specification into C code is briefly presented. The code produced proves to be efficient and can compete with a hand written code. The optimization process is even pushed further: the C code produced can be automatically vectorized to address Altivec extension for PowerPC (instruction-motorola) and SSE and SSE2 extensions for Intel architecture (instruction-intel). A method is proposed to determine whether or not a Faust expression can be vectorized by crossing a type information (synthesized during an upward run-around in the syntactic tree to be compiled) and a contextual information (inherited during a downward run-around in the syntactic tree). Thanks to this method, we are able to find expressions that can be vectorized inside recursive expressions that are not supposed to be vectorizable. The quality of the code produced by Faust is evaluated. On one hand, scalar code produced by Faust is compared to vector code produced by Faust, on the other hand, scalar and vector code are compared to code optimized by hand. In the end, we briefly present code transformations to vectorize the expressions classed as non-vectorizable by the previous method so that even better performances can be achieved in the future.

Nicolas Scaringella, Yann Orlarey, Stéphane Letz, Dominique Fober

Mots-clés :
Audio, Compiler, Processing, Signal, Vectorization